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Thursday, May 21, 2020 | History

4 edition of Zimbabwe culture: ruins and reactions found in the catalog.

Zimbabwe culture: ruins and reactions

Gertrude Caton-Thompson

Zimbabwe culture: ruins and reactions

by Gertrude Caton-Thompson

  • 228 Want to read
  • 22 Currently reading

Published by Cass in London .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Great Zimbabwe (Extinct city),
  • Zimbabwe
    • Subjects:
    • Great Zimbabwe (Extinct city),
    • Zimbabwe -- Antiquities.

    • Edition Notes

      Bibliography: p. [32]-35.

      Statementby G. Caton Thomspon.
      SeriesCass library of African studies. African prehistory,, no. 1
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsDT962.9.Z5 C37 1971
      The Physical Object
      Pagination299 p.
      Number of Pages299
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL5323308M
      ISBN 100714618861
      LC Control Number72175986

      African as the baobab tree and as Zimbabwean as the Great Zimbabwe Ruins. It traces the incidence of same sex relations in pre-colonial and post colonial Zimbabwe. It also argues that based on their professional values, social workers in Zimbabwe should promote social justice through assisting the gay community. Key words. The online auction site dedicated to the sale of rare books, maps & prints, documents, letters, ephemera and vintage photography.

        The anthropological and historical literature dealing with Africa abounds with references to a people called the ‘Hamites’. ‘Hamite’, as used in these writings, designates an African population supposedly distinguished by its race— Caucasian—and its language family, from the Negro inhabitants of the rest of Africa below the by:   “A God in Ruins” carries the narrative and the Todds from World War II through the present in a family no longer at peace with itself and an England that seems to be : Corinna Lothar.

      The Zimbabwe culture: ruins and reactions / by G. Caton-Thomspon Caton-Thompson, Gertrude, [ Book: ] At 14 libraries. This resource is very relevant to your query (score: 72,) The Badarian civilisation and predynastic remains near Badari / by Guy Brunton and Gertrude Caton-Thompson.   Godwin's "When a Crocodile Eats the Sun" is not only compelling and well-written, but more timely than ever. A memoir of his adult life after having left Zimbabwe, the place of his birth (he is a journalist for National Geographic and a slew of other top-notch publications), Godwin painfully portrays the experience of white Africans in Zimbabwe /5.


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Zimbabwe culture: ruins and reactions by Gertrude Caton-Thompson Download PDF EPUB FB2

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Caton-Thompson, Gertrude. Zimbabwe culture. Oxford, Clarendon Press, (OCoLC) Document Type. Genre/Form: Bibliography: Additional Physical Format: Online version: Caton-Thompson, Gertrude, Zimbabwe culture: ruins and reactions.

London, Cass, Great Zimbabwe is a ruined city in the south-eastern hills of Zimbabwe near Lake Mutirikwe and the town of was the capital of the Kingdom of Zimbabwe during the country's Late Iron uction on the city began in the 11th century and continued until it Coordinates: 20°16′S 30°56′E / °S.

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Out of Print--Limited Availability. See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions. Price New from Used from Hardcover "Please retry" $ $ $ Hardcover $ 1 Used from $ The Zimbabwe Culture: Ruins and Reactions (Cass library of African studies.

African prehistory) [Caton-Thompson, Gertrude] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. The Zimbabwe Culture: Ruins and Reactions (Cass library of African studies. African prehistory)Cited by:   Visits to the National Museum, Zimbabwe Ruins (’Zimbabwe’ means a house built of stones), Victoria Falls are strongly recommended.

Canadian Perspective: In Harare: the Book Café is a good source for entertainment, panel discussions, lectures and food; Theatre in the Park for drama—located in Harare Gardens; cultural events held at the.

Great Zimbabwe was an important commercial and political center. In addition to being in the heart of an extensive commercial and trading network, the site was the center of a powerful political kingdom, which was under a central ruler for about years (– AD).

The site is estimated to have contained perh inhabitants, making it one of the largest cities of its day. Great Zimbabwe, extensive stone ruins of an African Iron Age city. It lies in southeastern Zimbabwe, about 19 miles (30 km) southeast of Masvingo.

The central area of ruins extends about acres (80 hectares); it is the largest of more than major stone ruins found in Zimbabwe and Mozambique.

Great Zimbabwe is a ruined city in the southeastern hills of Zimbabwe near Lake Mutirikwe and the town of was the capital of the Kingdom of Zimbabwe during the country's Late Iron uction on the monument by ancestors of the Shona people began in the 11th century and continued until the 15th century, [1] [2] spanning an area of hectares (1, acres) which, at its.

Her book, The Zimbabwe Culture: Ruins & Reactions was based on artifacts, the dwellings themselves, and the oral traditions of the people living in the area, and remains a classic to this day.

In the s, more modern investigative tools, such as radiocarbon dating, became available, and the site was proved to be not as ancient as many. Caton-Thompson’s book Zimbabwe Culture published by Oxford at the Clarendon Press has only a single reference for Zinjanja saying: a similarly constructed mound lies within the mound of Regina Ruins, not many miles away; these structures resemble, on a large scale, the stone hut circles outside the ruins at.

The Zimbabwe Culture - Ruins and Reactions by Caton-Thompson, G. and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at   The ruins at Great Zimbabwe are the most extensive in sub-Saharan Africa, and arguably the most emotive.

The name 'Zimbabwe' probably comes from the Shona phrase Ziimba dza Mabwe 1, meaning 'Houses of Stone'. 30km south-west of Masvingo 2 in Zimbabwe 3, the ruins sit on a m plateau, at the base of some low granite hills on otherwise open plains, with few trees. Caton-Thompson investigated the site and was able to definitively argue in her work, The Zimbabwe Culture: Ruins & Reactions () that the ruins were of African origin.

She assessed the available archeological evidence (artifacts, nearby dwellings), and the oral tradition of the modern Shona-speaking people, and compared them to the ancient. Zimbabwe has five World Heritage sites, which are Great Zimbabwe, Khami, Matobo Hills, Victoria Falls, and Mana Pools.

The Nyanga Terraces are on the Tentative List (Fig. 1).Great Zimbabwe, Khami, and the Nyanga Terraces are managed by the National Museums and Monuments of Zimbabwe (NMMZ), while the Victoria Falls and Mana Pools are run by the Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management. Caton-Thompson investigated the site and was able to definitively argue in her work, The Zimbabwe Culture: Ruins & Reactions () that the ruins were of African origin.

She assessed the available archeological evidence (artifacts, nearby dwellings), and the oral tradition of the modern Shona-speaking people, and compared them to the ancient.

PDF | On Jan 1,Simon Makuvaza and others published The world heritage sites of Zimbabwe: Research, development and some conservation issues. In Smith, C. (ed.) Encyclopedia of Global Author: Simon Makuvaza. In Gertrude Caton-Thompson investigated the site and wrote "The Zimbabwe Culture: Ruins & Reactions" ().

She said the ruins and the art found at Great Zimbabwe were of African origin. The Book of the Glory of the Blacks; The Golden Age of West African Civilization; Daily Life in the Kingdom of the Kongo; Afrikan Genesis, Volume I; African Origins of Major “Western Religions” Royal Arts of Africa; Nile Valley Contributions to Civilization: Exploding the Myths: ; The Irritated Genie; The Zimbabwe Culture: Ruins and.

See King Solomon, Ophir, Great Zimbabwe (African Civilizations), Great Zimbabwe: The Iron Age in South Central Africa, The Mystery of the Great Zimbabwe: A New Solution, The Zimbabwe Culture: Origins and Decline of Southern Zambezian States, The Zimbabwe Culture: Ruins and Reactions, Zimbabwe Monomatapa Culture in Southeast Africa, Encyclopedia of Mysterious Places: The Life and .2David Randall-MacIver, "The Rhodesian Ruins: Their Probable Origin and Significance," Geographical Jour 4 (); and Medieval Rhodesia (London, ).

3Gertrude Caton-Thompson, The Zimbabwe Culture: Ruins and Reactions (London, ). The International Journal of African Historical Studies, 21, 2 () Zimbabwe-phase ruins appear to have been built during Zimbabwe's peak (c.

I), and probably represent an extension of political authority. They can be visualized as local administrative Author: Thomas Huffman.